Redcar steelworkers pay UK tax. Chinese Steelworkers don’t.

Quote

Redcar steelworkers pay UK tax. Chinese Steelworkers don’t.

By Peter Martin Twitter: @petermartin52

An economic and political discussion usually and rather quickly gets around to a discussion on “the deficit”. Of course what everyone means is the Government’s deficit rather than the deficit neo-liberal politicians have created in our spending power in recent years. The other less mentioned deficit is the one the UK runs in its trade and financial dealings with the rest of the world. There are various terms used in connection with this such as current account deficit, balance of payments deficit. Then there is the capital account which includes the sale of gilts. To keep things simple I’ll just use the term external deficit for the net flow of ££ out of the economy. So we can think of this as the Surplus the Rest of the World has in its dealing with the UK in £ terms.

If we consider everything as a surplus we can say:

Government Surplus  + Private Domestic Sector Surplus(or PDS savings) + Rest of the World Surplus = 0

This is the well known sectoral balance equation. The Private Domestic Sector would essentially be the real economy and would include all publicly employed workers, local councils and their workers,  and even some Govt owned companies – though this might just depend on how the accounts are presented. This is just in £ terms. They don’t include any real assets like gold reserves or land holdings.

Going back to deficits this works out as:

Internal Deficit (Govt Budget Deficit) = PDS Savings + External Deficit (Trade)

It is common in discussions for someone to say something like ‘the trade deficit is not the fiscal Deficit.” Which is of course true, butthe two deficits are very closely related. If, as now, we are running a 5% of GDP trade deficit and the  Government is running a 4% deficit there is 1% more spending leaving the economy to pay our net import bill than is replenished by the Govt deficit. That money has to come out of everyone’s savings. So if the external deficit was zero the Government deficit would certainly be reduced substantially and may even be eliminated completely. Another way to look at it would be to say that money paid out for imports can’t be taxed but if it is paid out for local products it can be. Money generated from export sales, or import replacements can be taxed too. Redcar steelworkers pay UK tax. Chinese Steelworkers don’t.

Exporting more, to the value of 2.6% of GDP and importing 2.6% less will close the trade gap completely.  This may require a some initial discomfort to achieve but it will be nowhere near as bad as continually putting up with with tax rises and spending cuts, ignoring the external deficit and running the economy into ever deeper recession.This is a saleable message that our politicians (are you reading this John McDonnell? ) could well explain to a sceptical public.

There are those MMT supporters who will not be at all pleased with the thrust of this argument.They will be thinking that we should not be using MMT to explain how our deficits can be reduced but, rather, we should be explaining how they do not matter. They’ll argue that the deficits are just numbers on a spreadsheet, that ££ are just like runs on a scoreboard, that the government is monetarily sovereign and that it can never run out of pounds, it can never involuntarily default and it can never go broke in any debt denominated in ££. They will further argue that exports are a net real cost to the economy and that imports are a net real benefit. Therefore we should be exporting as little as possible and importing as much as possible. Of course, this is all absolutely true and intellectually incontrovertible. Except, I would just question the morality of deliberately taking more from the world than we are prepared to give in return.

It is also true is that we live in a democracy and we have to assess the chances of the voters ‘buying’ this argument in sufficient numbers for Labour to win in 2020. I am not a politician but I would say there is no chance at all. So, if this is a correct assessment, we have to look for the next best alternative. If we don’t offer that, which is an economy at relatively full employment with low internal and external deficits, stable but modest levels of growth, inflation and interest rates, we will end up with something very much worse.  An economy with high levels of unemployment and underemployment, high numbers of low paid and low productivity jobs, higher internal and external deficits, and with a government which is forever chasing its own tail with a succession of tax rises, spending cuts and the encouragement of excess private credit created asset bubbles.  In fact, just like the one we have now.

People are sick of all that. We just need sensible politicians to explain that there is a much better, if not a perfect, option