Disgraceful Academy Chain Head was *Sick* at GOOD OFSTED rating

Latest Twist on saga of Academy Chain Inspiration Trust

Latest News on Academy Saga

Previously posted by Jamie Smith here

“Leaked emails to a national newspaper show head of the Inspiration Trust felt sick at a Norwich school’s ‘Good’ Ofsted rating. ‘

There are increasing reports that Academisation has failed, and has always been a veil for back-door privatisation. Recently, Cameron suggested “coasting schools” could also be targets for his Academisation Programme. Academy sponsors clearly do not see schools as educational establishments, merely yet more public assets to be sold off. Hewett school’s OFSTED report is a tribute to the hard working children and teachers, and should be celebrated.  Clearly Dame Rachel De Souza does not agree.

The email correspondence seen by the Guardian newspaper between the head of the trust, Dame Rachel De Souza and its chairman, Sir Theodore Agnew in 2013 has lead to anti-academies campaigner and Norwich South Labour MP Clive Lewis to raise further doubts about the trust’s suitability as a sponsor for the Hewett School.”

Clive said:
“Why would a so-called leader in education feel sick at a school being graded as ‘Good’ by Ofsted?  Imagine how the children would feel if they knew the person who could be running their school next year felt ‘sick’ at them being graded as Good.”

“Being ‘Good’ is a cause for celebration, not dismay, and Dame De Souza should apologise for her remarks. Such comments will only increase resentment amongst the parents and community of the Hewett school who overwhelmingly stated they do not want the Inspiration Trust involved with their school.”

“I shall be writing to the DfE on this matter, questioning why they believe Inspiration and its chief executive are fit to run this school or any other for that matter. It also raises questions again about the politicisation of Ofsted gradings.”

The Hewett has been at the centre of a row locally, with a decision due imminently from the Secretary of State on whether or not the Inspiration Trust takes over the school.  Recent results from a local consultation overwhelmingly showed that local people were against the plans.

Clive has been supporting the “We Back Hewett” campaign.

From Cradle to Grave – Jeremy Corbyn’s National Education System

From Cradle to Grave – Jeremy Corbyn’s National Education System

It is seventy years this week, since the Labour Party achieved a landslide victory after the war. It must have been so exciting looking forward to peace, to the promise of a better world for ordinary people. Homes for all, and a National Health Service, a Welfare state.

Daily-Herald-27-July-1945Daily Herald “Labour in Power” 27th July 1945

Those days were remembered, in Think Left’s blog Academisation and the Demolition of our Education System

After the war, the hope was that the Labour Party would introduce policies which would change the lives of working class people, leading to a fairer society, and a fair education system was on their list.

It was not just the working class who knew things needed to change. It had been clear that there was a shortage of skills during the war, and this led to the 1944 Education Act  which led to the provision of free state education for all children from 5 -15.

The incoming socialist Labour government, led by Attlee, and inspired by Bevan, brought in popular policies, especially the introduction of a universal National Health Service, and an extensive social housing building programme. To the disappointment of many, a universal National Education Service was not an outcome, and this omission led to decades of disruption to an education service which, as I write, is now at a point of re-privatisation.

attlee mug

Attlee’s government did not go far enough to eradicate the class-ridden divisiveness caused the by privileges from private education and public schools. The state-funded education system introduced was a tripartite system of grammar, secondary modern and rarer technical schools. Selection at eleven would determine the course of a child’s life before even reaching puberty. Meanwhile, the rich and privileged continued to send their children to private and public schools, which opened the doors to an elitist society and via Oxbridge right into the heart of our political system, maintaining class divisions.

Had Attlee’s government made the brave decision to solve the problem of private and Church schools, and introduced a free universal education system for all, and eradicated private education, I believe it would have led to a fairer, and much more settled system which would have benefited all as the NHS has done.

But seventy years on, that dream is still alive. Jeremy Corbyn wants to see a National Education System. Corbyn wants to see investment in education system from cradle to grave. Education is not about training for a job, about ticking boxes and league tables. Education is about enriching our lives – and life long learning. It is fifty years since Harold Wilson’s inspirational Open University which opened doors for so many.

Sadly, Tory cuts and fees have taken the “Open” away and closed doors to this university without walls. Education should not end with a school certificate. There is so much knowledge and skills to share. Education benefits us all. Corbyn’s Education policy will put an end to tuition fees, and restore grants. Building on that, his plan for an NES and a life-long learning service will open up  education for everyone and enrich our lives and our society. And we can start this dream at the very beginning of an incoming parliament. This is exciting, positive politics and the spirit of ’45 is alive again.

Jeremy Corbyn writes  for Labour List

“The case for investing in early years education towards universal free childcare is overwhelming. A study by PriceWaterhouseCoopers a decade ago told us that in the long-term universal childcare would more than pay for itself – due to extra tax revenues from those in work and productivity gains. Politicians like to dress up in hard hats and hi-vis jackets on their pet construction projects, but lack the same enthusiasm for investment in social infrastructure.

In 2020 we should start by reversing the cuts to the adult skills budget and expand it into a lifelong learning service by adding 2% to corporation tax (still comfortably the lowest in the G7). This funding would be hypothecated to expand adult learning into a lifelong learning education resource. The extra tax revenues brought by a high skill, high productivity and high pay economy will fund further expansion.

A National Education Service will give working age people access throughout their lives to learn new skills or to re-train. It should also work with Jobcentre Plus to offer claimants opportunities to improve their skills, rather than face the carousel of workfare placements, sanctions and despair. We need a return to ambitious joined-up government.

While slashing college funding, George Osborne boasts of increasing apprenticeships. Yet too many are low quality, failing to give young people the transferable skills they need to get on.

It is clear that some employers are using apprenticeships and traineeships as a means of circumventing minimum wage legislation. This has to end. The minimum wage must be equalised across the board – with no poverty rates like the current £2.73 per hour apprenticeship rate.

Under a National Education Service, colleges should work in partnership with employers to mutually accredit apprenticeships and courses that offer high quality transferable skills. Councils and government agencies should also use public procurement contracts to guarantee good apprenticeships.

The best employers understand the business case for investing in staff – in increased employee productivity and staff retention – and that’s why it is right to ask business to pay slightly more in corporation tax to fund it, while still leaving UK corporation tax the lowest in the G7.

Government must play a strategic co-ordinating role in a modern economy. For too long the UK approach has been to stand back, ‘let the market decide’, then hope for the best. A National Education Service will be a lifelong learning service for a lifetime of opportunity.

How refreshing to hear positive , sensible policies from Labour. Jeremy Corbyn speaks, honestly, pragmatic, socially desirable policies. He challenges the Tory myth of austerity, and these are the policies people have been calling for. All Labour supporters should sign up and vote for Jeremy Corbyn, who is just what the Labour Party and the people of Britain need. He certainly has my vote, my best wishes, and hopes.

Opening Pandora’s Box, Austerity and Jeremy Corbyn

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Opening Pandora’s Box. Austerity and Jeremy Corbyn

1. The Challenge

As a child I learned of honestly, fairness and justice, and I learned about socialism. These philosophies go hand-in-hand. But in my lifetime, The Labour Party I loved has become fearful of the truth, and has lost the trust of the electorate. Now, we are facing a leadership election, when for the first time in decades there is a real opportunity to change.

Recently, Syriza MP Costas Lapavitsas said Jeremy Corbyn, standing as a candidate for Labour leadership was “exactly what Britain could do with” and he could inject common sense and values into the Labour Party.  So it was reported in the Telegraph, where Syriza is referred to as “hard-left”, when in fact it is a moderate, democratic party, and rose to power by democratic means because the Greek electorate have been damaged by austerity.

Recent elections have not achieved the great change as in 1945 because of the establishment’s stranglehold. There are immense riches for some and yet the state’s responsibility to its ordinary citizens has been eroded, and today the welfare state, rather than an  insurance against destitution is now being sold as a means of scrounging from others.

Solidarity, socialism, and neighbourliness,  are words from the past which we are told was some far-left extremism and  has no place in the future.  That fear of being destitute, of being alone and helpless is a direct result of neoliberalism.  Austerity, created by the IMF and described in the Zombie Economy was hatched seventy years ago in New Hampshire, has been pursued around the world ever since.

They have overseen the transfer of power from the State to the private institutions and corporations.

Ordinary people in the UK, as around the world know that austerity has failed,  yet increasingly they feel that their votes will achieve nothing. What do they say to politicians who ask for their votes on the doorstep?

“There is no point in voting; they’re all the same.”

“They’re all in it for themselves.”

“They are all liars!”

“They only want to know at election time.”

“I like Labour, but we can’t trust you with the Economy.

“Too many immigrants taking our jobs.”

“Labour overspent.”

“I’m not interested in Politics.”

That may be a fair assessment of the situation from their view but I am filled with despair. The Labour Party’s recent abstentions on the Welfare Bill resulted in it being carried. Harriet Harman made a grave mistake, and the Labour Party let down the people, itself, and all those party members and voters who thought they were voting against the Tories in May.  Why is this happening? Nothing will change until Austerity is challenged and the truth is out. No one is challenging it because of fear and disinformation.

2. 1983 Manifesto was too left wing

Labour’s 1983 Manifesto was not extremely Left Wing. Some examples include:

  •  In 1983 Labour promised to invest in homes, transport, new technologies and industry.
  • It promised to work for equality, for women – equal pay, maternity pay and assistance for child care
  • Planned for Investment in Education, and Provision for under-fives
  • It proposed to improve the environment, to tackle pollution and to conserve energy.
  • It planned initiatives to promote peace and development around the world, and to cancel Trident and not to co-operate with Cruise Missile deployment,
  • Labour would have expanded services for social care and to reverse Tory cuts in the maternity grant.
  • Begin a Strategy to Eliminate Low Pay.
  • Open immediate negotiations with our EEC partners, and introduce the necessary legislation, to prepare for Britain’s withdrawal from the EEC, to be completed well within the lifetime of the Labour government.
  • Rebuild British industry , and up these steps with a new National Investment Bank, new industrial powers, and a new Department for Economic and Industrial Planning.

Expanding on the details here show refreshing, positive policies describing a world I wished we could have seen.  It was not this manifesto that led to Labour’s defeat in 1983. They called it the greatest suicide note in political history. It looks more like a survival note for a thriving society. Neil Clark in the Guardian, describes how that defeat determined how the resistance to neoliberalism crumbled.

“That moment in 1983 was the last great opportunity to derail the neoliberal bandwagon before it did lasting damage to the UK’s economic and social fabric. Labour’s emergency programme of action would have halted the de-industrialisation of Britain and removed the spectre of mass unemployment from the land. The re-imposition of exchange controls would have put a brake on the growing power of international finance; thanks to Thatcher’s deregulatory measures – money power was soon to rule the roost.”


The yawning wealth gap, already starting to develop in 1983, would have been reversed by Labour’s staunchly progressive tax policies.

3. Popularity of Tory Government in 1982

In 1981 and 1982, the Tory cuts were very unpopular, and Michael Foot’s Labour Party was well ahead of the Tories in 1982. But Margaret Thatcher’s gamble to send a task force to the Falklands ignited a false patriotism where flag-waving citizens cheered the task force on its way. Thatcher’s gamble paid off. In times of austerity, it was like some kind of hysterical party.  It was a close thing, but without victory in the Falklands it is unlikely she would have remained in power.

‘The nation drank deep of an experience it had not enjoyed since 1945: a clear military triumph. The victory dragged Thatcher’s leadership from the brink of collapse. She won global celebrity, in both the United States and the Soviet Union, and 10 points were added to her poll rating. She was at last in the lead over Labour. The emergent Social Democrats never recovered. Thatcher wrapped herself in the flag, denouncing all sceptics and crudely boasting the renaissance of the British people as a world power against dictatorship.’

4. The Social Democratic Party, and The Alliance WITH LIBERALS

In 1983, the British electoral system was very much a two-party affair, and as we have seen recently, in a first-past-the-post electoral system, a divided opposition inevitably leads to defeat. In 1981, four former Labour cabinet ministers Bill Rogers, Shirley Williams, David Owen and Roy Jenkins had crossed the floor and formed the SDP. In 1983, ten days before the General Election, an SDP-Liberal Alliance was formed. Their agreement not to oppose seats resulted in Thatcher’s biggest ever electoral landslide. The lesson of the need for Party  unity, I hope was learned. In this betrayal, we have all paid dearly.

The Falklands war and the SDP-Alliance splitting the vote,  swung it for Mrs Thatcher not the Labour manifesto whatever the press and Blairites say. I remember it as clear as it was day, what a shock it was. The press was wicked. That is what started fear of the truth.

As we know the victors write the history.  The massive privatisation policies of the Thatcher years, which continued under Blairism, is still continuing today, though we have little left to sell off, would have been averted.

Instead, what resulted was that Thatcher’s parasitic, out-of-control capitalism grew exponentially. Manufacturing declined further, unemployment soared, employment rights eroded, and what we have been left with is a growing inequality where fear of being trampled on has led to social divisions and isolationism.

5. Pandora’s Box – the Trap of Fear

Pandora’s Box of Fear needs to be wrenched open, and truth revealed, and spoken. To be fearful to expose the evils and injustice in the world is to perpetuate it. In the reality, it is the Tories who will fear the most. Their project fear is Corbyn. They do not fear his opponents, but make no mistake, they want to nip our claim to a more equal economy “in the bud“.

Listen to Jeremy Corbyn, and  you will hear he talks sensible, pragmatic, socially desirable policies which are supported by the electorate. His approach is courageous and honest, as shown in his decision to join 47 other Labour MPs, and the SNP and Liberal Democrats to oppose the Welfare Bill.  As the only candidate to oppose austerity, and the neoliberal Tory agenda, he shows he has real Labour values. He is not afraid to speak the truth. We have heard enough lies, and felt enough fear. We must be proud of our achievements in government, and recognise where we have made mistakes – and why.

The myth of the inevitability of  neoliberalism must be countered, and the politicians need to speak honestly. We need to be Straight Talking Labour. As Tony Benn said  “Say what you mean and mean what you say.”

6. Exposing the Truth, the Emperor’s New Clothes

The fable of the Emperor’s new clothes is well-known. Everyone could see the emperor was naked , but too fearful to challenge so they admired his new clothes. Everyone knows that the very, very rich, are the real scroungers  – representing a hidden welfare state while millions depend on food banks in this country alone. If everyone knows this, then why is our Labour Party still supporting Tory cuts and austerity? It is time to call the Emperor’s bluff.

From our defeat was borne fear of telling the truth. But truth is always the way. Remember the lines of Tony Benn? “Say what you mean and mean what you say!” Wise words. Lies always get caught out – Blair – Cameron over Syria. If there is one thing which puts people of voting it is lies. Look how the non voting numbers rose. But Jeremy speaks honestly. He speaks the truth. The prospect of Jeremy Corbyn leading my party warms my heart at last. I cannot have that confidence in Burnham, Cooper or Kendall. I used to admire Harriet Harman. She has disgraced the party in not opposing the Welfare Bill, and I admire every MP who voted against the welfare cuts. She let the party and the other candidates down, but they let themselves down then by not having the courage to oppose and lead.

Jeremy Corbyn has my vote, and my best wishes and hopes.

REFERENCES and FURTHER READING:

An Open Letter to my Comrades in the Labour Party

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An Open Letter to my Comrades in the Labour Party

Previously published here

CX4JE5 Rare 1940's vintage UK Labour Party enamel badge, featuring the Liberty logo which was used until 1983

I am so, so sad. What is happening to our beloved party? To which I have belonged for nearly 50 years, having joined the Young Socialists at the age of 15. Yes I have always been on the left of the party, but that’s fine – like any democratic organisation we are an amalgamation of those with differing points of views and sometimes the votes at conference may not agree with our individual wishes. But that is democracy – or what I have always believed. 

I voted for other candidates in the last few leadership elections, but supported those elected as I believe a loyal member should. I will do the same this time if my choice is not that of the majority of my comrades.

 However I honestly believe that Jeremy Corbyn will be the best leader for us and want him to win. I have followed his career for years and know him to be someone of sincere views. On a personal note he supported a long campaign with which I was involved with modesty and compassion. Just as I would expect.   

The party introduced the £3 supporters ‘ticket’ to allow non-members to join in the election process. And are now complaining about the possibility of ‘infilitration’. They are of course mentioning militant tendancy, communists and other ‘far left’ groups. My immediate fear on the announcement of this innovation was Conservatives and others joining to skew the votes. 

Ed Miliband’s election to the leadership ticked all the right boxes for the party hierarchy but he proved unelectable in this year’s General Election. So the claims that Jeremy Corbyn could prove unelectable to the electorate in five years time are, seriously, laughable.   

I do a bit of political blogging and normally would be out there giving it a go in support of Jeremy. However there are too many party members showing disloyalty and divisiveness to the country that it has taken me a time to even think about publishing this blog. I am not attacking those who oppose me and others who agree with me. I just ask them to moderate their voices a little.   
I am going to do that boring thing that old people do. I am going to repeat myself and suggest that anyone wavering about the state of the country and what is the difference between Jeremy and the other candidates read a book. Not great literature [I was an Eng Lit lecturer in an earlier incarnation] but a reminder of why the Labour Party and the Trade Unions came into being. And why we need Jeremy Corbyn as our leader: ‘The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists’ by Robert Tressell. Read it, weep and then vote for Jeremy Corbyn. 

 Labour Party Member
and Unite Member 
Photo: The old Labour Party Badge. Lovely isn’t it?