There are two Labour parties now. The small controlling party of Blair, and the party of the membership.

Quote

The Great Ron Rafferty says*:

A brief history of the world …. From the time of Kinnock, there was an ever-increasing vetting procedure of new Labour candidates.  That started off from a relatively weak administrative point from the Central Office perspective, but it quickly became more and more controlling over the past 30 years, and what better cover than deciding that only people from certain groups could stand as candidates.  So we ended up with a massive percentage of “on-message” MPs.

Now fast forward to last summer, and the sudden realisation by the on-message ones, that they were no longer on message with the people they claimed to represent.  Their own manifesto demonstrated this.  As the media had tried to paint Ed Miliband as Red Ed, the Labour Party machine moved forever towards the right until in several aspects it WAS to the right of the Tories!  This is the “being in power” bollocks that is constantly uttered.  Being in power …. for what?  If being in power is to be worse than the Tories, then it IS actually better having the Tories FFS!

The election of Corbyn, who, despite efforts to paint him almost as a communist (the new Red Ed) was centre-left, saw a whole cadre of the Labour machine rejecting him, and rejecting their membership.

He was never ever given a chance to be a leader.  Sniping from the Coup-ers** NEVER stopped.  They used social media to keep in contact with the mainstream media (oh, how hollow their protests now sound about others using social media …..), placed anti-Corbyn stories, and the continuing line that only the coup-ers were true Labour, not their leader, and certainly not their membership!

Planning for a coup for 10 months.  No principles.  But the membership – now there’s a bit of a problem!

The coup, which was intended to psychologically attack the leader failed, because he stood up to the outrageous deceit and bullying.  (In any other context on earth, the Guardian would have railed against the bullies, and quite rightly!).  But Corbyn wasn’t broken.  Did the coup members bother that this was anti-democratic?  Did they bother that it was against their memberships expressed wishes?  Did they bother that it was against the wishes of most CLPs?

As that didn’t work …. over to the NEC, and the same coup-ers not quite in charge of things.  Sob stories about representatives being threatened (a bizarre bit of histrionics compared to what they had attempted on Corbyn!).  No sticking to the normal rules of committees, and what is the solution to the membership “problem?”  Cut off as many members as possible!  Stop the membership meeting in the CLPs!

This is NOT a group of people trying to “save” the Labour Party.  This is a group of people who believe they OWN the Labour Party, and will do precisely what they want.  It is a right-wing takeover.  And the people hark back to the days of Blair where they say one thing, and mean another, where war is good, where the class from which their members are taken is good as cannon fodder without equipment, where a useless and expensive piece of nuclear gear is more important than ships that work, and where those same poor folk will continue to pay for the errors of the rich.

But, there again, time after time, it is the rich who pay for their coup “friends.”  A few millions promised here, a few hundreds of thousands there, a “helpful” but restricted legal challenge (that’ll do nicely).

There are TWO Labour parties now.  The small controlling party of Blair, and the party of the membership.

Whose side are you on?

 

*Comments thread https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jul/15/labour-death-spite-bullying-working-class-base

**coup plotters

NB This is important

Wise words – ‘Keep Calm and Support Corbyn’

‘The last thing anyone on the Left must do in response to these outrages is to be outraged however. There will be more to come.

More members will be suspended. Applicants for registered supporter status will be excluded – even in some cases if they have been accepted as Labour Party members (after the January cut off date). Other local parties will face unjustified administrative sanctions.

All of this has a dual purpose. First – and vitally – to diminish Corbyn’s support in the election. Secondly – and this is not unimportant – in the hope of provoking an angry response which can feed the narrative that the left are vile bullies.’

jonrogers1963.blogspot.co.uk/…/keep-calm-and-support-corbyn…

Young Eyes to see a Future for Labour.

Quote

Jeremy Corbyn’s new politics is about mutual respect, open debate and inclusivity.

The problem is that MPs of all parties have become so out of touch with public opinion, which is why the referendum result took them all by surprise. The reason that they are so out of touch is because they are unrepresentative.

For example, the average age of MPs elected at the 2015 General Election is 50, as with 2010. The recent referendum showed wide differences of opinion between various demographic groups yet still this particular group is greatly unrepresented. Generally supportive of remaining  in the EU, it is unsurprising they feel their ideas are ignored. Austerity policies have affected this group. Abolition of maintenance grants, increased tuition fees,  unaffordable rents, inflated house-prices for first time buyers  and poor pay are difficulties obstructing young people getting on in life. This group need  a voice in parliament. It is our responsibility to give the young a chance.

We need fresh ideas. We need real people in parliament not Oxbridge careerists.  Young people want a say in how their future, and who are we to stop them?

The Labour Party supports opening up the voting to people of 16. This was one of the policies identified by Jeremy Corbyn’s campaign for leader. In addition, we need younger people in the Commons. But in today’s climate how can that be achieved?

Grants, and training for young people who would like to contribute to the debates which will change their society for the better should be made widely available. 

Kenneth writes:

Kenneth Jones:  I’m 71 in a few days time, I would like to let the young people know in my humble opinion they have had a very bad deal from the MPs in the UK.

I want,  sincerely,  to see many more youthful Labour MPs come forward to represent the people.

Without exception,  in my experience of young people, they are much more caring and loyal.  It’s  just that we don’t encourage them to be involved. I have just read somewhere that Mr Corbyn wants the Labour Party to help young MPs to come forward and the party will pay the fees.

So bring it on, you youngsters,  show us you’re up for the job!  And help heal the wounds the conservatives have inflicted on us.  You are the future.

Related Links:

Call for Mandatory Reselection of Labour MPs

Quote

It is not acceptable for a small group of elected MPs to hold the Labour movement to ransom. We are greater than that. Millions of people have supported Jeremy Corbyn as leader of the Labour Party and he was elected with a massive mandate.

Labour Party members worked for them and voted for them, and yet once in power it has been possible to betray each of those by lack of respect to democracy and  basic principles of the Labour Movement which they purport to represent. It seems fair enough to expect self-discipline, loyalty and mutual respect between every one of us. 

The time has come to look at accountability of Labour MPs to their constituency Labour Party members.

MPs resigned

After the events leading to mass resignations of the shadow cabinet, it is clear trust is not enough. We press for the TUC, Labour Members and Affiliated Unions  to  consider mandatory re-selection of Labour MP with this petition.

This is not just about Jeremy Corbyn. It is about you, me, and our children, and future generations. It is about the Labour Party and democracy.

The current policy of not allowing reselection of Labour MPs is undemocratic, and is leading to disloyalty, to the elected leader and the membership of the Labour Party, on a massive scale. Labour MPs should be selected by, and be accountable to the local party membership. This is more democratic and is standard practice in other UK political parties. MPs must be accountable to their members as well as their constituents.

 

Change.Org Mandatory Reselection of Labour MPs

 

Please sign , and share this petition. 

Thankyou.

 

 

The other reasons why Labour lost in 2015

Quote

For the most part, Margaret Beckett has managed to avoid the firing line for her 35 page report as to why Labour lost the 2015 GE.  Essentially, the report (which can be read here) does not fit easily into the Labour Right’s or the media’s frame of reference… vague or bland was the best they could come up with.  The press tried to whip up some excitement about ‘the suppression of a secret report’ about focus group findings but the task of blaming Jeremy Corbyn for Labour’s defeat in 2015 eventually proved too convoluted.  However, Jamie Reed MP did his best in a valiant effort for Progress:

Any Labour leader who refuses to listen to the country and who prizes the views of Labour members above Labour voters and former Labour voters will likely find that although they may secure the Labour crown, they will lose the Labour kingdom.’

In other words, the lesson from 2015 is that ‘the LP has the wrong membership’.. which reminds me of an old joke about the wrong electorate (but repetition of the word ‘Labour’ 6x in one sentence must be worth a mention).

 

Coming from the Left, I thought that the Beckett report was fair enough but that there were plenty of things left unsaid, that might have been usefully included.

But first, let’s be absolutely clear, the Tories won a majority because the Liberal Democrats imploded (-15.2%).  

Given that in most LD held seats, the Conservatives were in second place, it was unsurprisingly that they took LD constituencies.  Conservatives replaced 27 LD MPs, and now represent virtually the whole of Devon and Cornwall, coast to coast.  Those constituencies alone provided the Tory majority.

The unasked question is ‘Why were Labour in third place (gaining only a few thousand votes) in constituencies which have high levels of poverty, high unemployment, high self-employment, high housing costs, inadequate transport/infrastructure and a historical lack of investment?’

That blame cannot be laid on the 2015 campaign.  The fact is that New Labour governments never focused on addressing the problems of rural Britain… and there certainly are big problems in rural areas, all across the UK.  Although, to be fair, Huw Irranca-Davies MP did try his best to highlight them at the Labour Party Conference 2014.

So Scotland … what a tragedy for a few great Labour MPs, like Katy Clark and others, but the truth is that many, if not most, Scottish Labour-held seats were profoundly neglected by their Blairite MPs.  Their constituents really were ‘taken for granted’.  As Ben Margulies puts it, ‘the SNP won by defeating the “rotten structures of Scottish Labour”

Again, this cannot fairly be laid at Ed Miliband’s feet.

Ian Williams in Tribune describes the birth of New Labour:

‘Clinton set the model for New Labour – ostentatiously disavowing calumniated “special interest groups”, while pandering to the right…..  Unlike Clinton, the Blair administration did a lot of good work – but party bosses did not want anyone boasting about it, in case it alienated the financiers whom they hoped would replace the unions as bankrollers for the party.

In both cases, the plan was to hollow out the popular base of the parties, denying members effective input on policy or candidates, to reduce it to a PO box for corporate donations. As we saw in the Labour Party, it became a self-perpetuating career escalator for machine politicians that eventually ruthlessly weeded out any signs of dissent and any ties with the unions apart from topping up the collection box.

And nowhere was this model more surely adopted than by Scottish New Labour MPs.

Yes, the tipping point in Scotland was the referendum … and it was Ed Miliband’s fault for supporting the idea …. But who in their right minds thought it was a good idea for Labour to join forces with the Tories in the No campaign!!?

The idea is surely repugnant to any left-winger but yet again the transatlantacist right of the LP were seduced by US fantasy politics which promotes ‘bipartisanship’ as a high ideal to which they should aspire. Perhaps, if they had actually been in touch with their membership, they might have realised sooner that it wasn’t an aspiration shared by their fellow Scots who saw it as further evidence of ‘Red Tories’… and the dissipating Labour vote (ignored from 2007 onward) finally rotted away.

Anyway, the collapse of the LD vote and the loss of 40 Scottish MPs might have been mitigated, had Labour not made another fatal mistake.

What on earth possessed them to oppose the EU Referendum?

Was this ‘Hell yeah’ politics, toughing it out, holding the line?  Even pro-EU voters were invited to feel patronized.  Talk about handing a majority to the Tories.

ComRes opinion polling (post-election) found that 17% of Conservative and LD voters, and 33% of Ukip voters would have considered voting Labour, if Labour had been in support of a referendum on the EU.  In terms of MPs, that alone would have deprived the Tories of their majority.  ComRes estimated that Labour would have gained 8 seats leaving the Conservatives with 323, 3 short of a majority.

The amazing thing is that in spite of losing 40 Scottish MPs, and 27 LD seats going straight to the Tories, Labour still increased its vote in England and Wales by 1.5m in 2015 whereas the Tories only gained 500k.  But unfortunately, Labour largely built up its vote in unwinnable and safe seats, and although, there were 22 gains, the loss of 48 meant that Labour ended up with only 232 MPs.

In fact, the British Election Study team found that

‘Miliband was seen as having a more successful campaign than Cameron, perhaps against low expectations. This rating of who ‘performed best in the campaign’ switched in Cameron’s favour shortly before the election’

 

It also seems that the Ed Miliband team made the false assumption that the Tories would lose votes to Ukip, and disillusioned LDs would switch to Labour.  In the event, Labour probably only gained about 8% of the 2010 LD vote, former LDs being more than prepared to vote Conservative.  (Amazingly a lot of LD votes must have gone to Ukip – only half of Ukip’s 3.8m votes seem to have been taken from former Con or Lab voters )

The final cutting irony was that the collapse of the LD vote meant that the Tories gained a further 7 MPs because Labour supporters (and others) withdrew their tactical votes for the LD MP.  For example in Lewes constituency which was considered to be a safe LD seat, Norman Baker MP lost 7925 votes which split fourways between Ukip, Labour, Greens and Conservatives.  The new Tory MP was elected with only 805 votes above the 2010 losing result.

In the final analysis, Mark Doel of Sheffield sums it up…it was the UK electoral system that won it for the Tories. Not since universal suffrage has any party with less than 37% of the popular vote gained an absolute majority in the UK parliament. In fact, the swing to Labour (1.5%) was almost twice that to the Conservatives (0.8%) ….

Talk of David Cameron “sweeping to victory” adds wind to the sails of a government that acts as though it has a massive mandate when, by any account, a 12-seat majority is tiny, especially as it is built on the fluke distribution of an historically small proportion of votes. We must stop allowing the Tories to present this result as “a convincing victory”.

Charles Cronin of London adds:

‘…Lynton Crosby’s seeming effortless success in promoting the Tory party’s domination of the media could only have succeeded with the editorial support of the media. The BBC, as it must, covered and followed the press agenda. Don’t give too much praise to the creator of the message: it was the messengers that swung it.’

 

However, I cannot finish without pin-pointing the role of the Blairite wing of the Labour Party, in Ed Miliband’s failure to win the 2015 GE.  This is of overwhelming significance for the electability of Jeremy Corbyn in 2020.

Professor Eunice Goes‘ assessment of the 2015 campaign was that:

Ed Miliband was a flawed leader but the responsibility for the Labour’s colossal defeat on May 7 does not rest solely on his shoulders. Party divisions, plots, constant media attacks paralysed the party, in particular its policy development process. When the electoral manifesto was finally approved last spring the proposals that came out were confusing, unconvincing and uninspiring as Miliband tried to cater to all factions and ended up pleasing none….

And writing before his election as leader, her contention was that Jeremy Corbyn will not be allowed to lead the LP:

‘.. he will be de facto prevented from leading the Labour Party. The weekly duels in the House Commons with the Prime Minister David Cameron will be the least of Corbyn’s worries. He will be torn apart by his parliamentary party and the media. He will not be able to develop a single policy proposal, as he will be spending most of his time and energy explaining and justifying every single word he uttered during his long parliamentary career about Europe, Trident, coal mines, people’s quantitative easing or Israeli oranges. In other words, his leadership will collapse under pressure from opposition and resistance from all fronts.

But when this will happen the right of the party will have few reasons to rejoice as there is no greater electoral turn-off than to see – as we’ve witnessed in the past weeks – the spectacle of Labour apparatchiks treating the party’s membership and their democratic choices with such contempt.’

 

The experience of the last 4 months bears ample witness to Eunice Goes’ prediction… and yet, there is still room for hope.  I am not alone in feeling reassured that the Corbyn/ McDonnell team is much more experienced and streetwise, than Ed Miliband’s.  In addition, the membership have been exposed to the Labour Establishment’s contempt for democracy.

Let’s hope that the ‘We had to destroy the village in order to save it’ mentality from the Labour Right eventually fades away, even if it is only out of self-interest.

 

http://www.scribd.com/doc/295975145 /Learning-the-Lessons-from-Defeat-Taskforce-Report

http://www.progressonline.org.uk/2016/01/23/all-my-sons/

http://www.huwirranca-davies.org.uk/what-can-labour-do-to-win-the-rural-vote/

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/53094-2/

http://www.tribunemagazine.org/2016/01/letter-from-america-ian-williams-3/

http://www.britishelectionstudy.com/bes-impact/learning-the-right-lessons-from-labours-2015-defeat/#.VqzyKuk27oA

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jan/24/lynton-crosbys-role-in-the-tory-election-victory

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/even-if-he-wins-jeremy-corbyn-will-never-be-able-to-lead-the-labour-party/

https://think-left.org/2015/08/30/what-the-labour-establishment-didnt-really-want-us-to-know/